Home Medicine Garden

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Home Medicine Garden
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Post # 1
Herbalism is a accessible, inexpensive, natural, gentle, and a effective system of healing. You would be surprised how fun it is to make your own salves, tinctures, syrups, capsules, and teas because you here the herbs yourself. Begin by making simple medicines for coughs, colds, cuts, infections, and sprains.



Dig up a small plot by the back door or in you backyard, plant your favorite medicinal herbs. Make sure you know which ones are which and put distance in between them. Medicinal Herbs can also easily be woven into the tapestry of an already established garden such as Echinacea, yarrow, and Valeria. They are lovely additions to flower gardens. They provide color, scent, and beauty. Calendula, chamomile, and thyme are planted in vegetable gardens and are said to enhance the growth and vitality of their vegetable partners. Medicinal Herbs such as basil, parsley, and dill are culinary herbs and are often found in their own patch as the herb garden.


It's surprising to learn that some of our most highly prized herbal medicine is found in familiar flowering herbs such as Valerian.

" Plants utilize nutrients in the soil to become vibrant and healthy." - Homegrown Herbs by: Tammi Hartung

Some medicinal herbs are easy to grow in a simple ladder or wagon-wheel desgin and/or in raised beds are: Basil, Calendula, Cayenne, Chamomile, Chickweed, Dandelion, Echinacea, Garlic, Lavender, Lemon balm, Licorice, Oats, Peppermint, Plantain, Red clover, Rosemary, Sage, St. John's wort, Spearmint, Thyme, Yarrow. The herbs are easy to grow but they get very large and may overtake a small garden.

Plant these at the edge of the garden: Burdock, Marsh mallow, Mullein, and Valerian.

These are grown easily in containers: Basil, Calendula, Cayenne, Chamomile, Chickweed, Dandelion, Echinacea, Garlic, Ginger, Lavender, Lemon balm, Peppermint, Plantain, Red clover, Rosemary, Sage, St. John's wort, Spearmint, Thyme, Turmeric, and Yarrow.

Roots are best dug in the fall or spring. Once you have harvested your herbs, you may want to dry some to preserve them for future use.
The best drying conditions for herbs are:
~ A steady warm temperature of around 90° to 110°F.
~ Minimal Humidity: the less, the better
~Good airflow
~Protection from direct sunlight
Many of the medicinal constituents in plants are heat sensitive, especially aromatic essential oils. Drying plants in temperatures above 110°F can cause compounds to dissipate.

Freezing is another great way to preserve medicinal herbs. Most herbs retain their medicinal properties, color, and taste when frozen. Use fresh herbs when possible.

Book: Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs A Beginners Guide
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Re: Home Medicine Garden
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Post # 2
Herbalism is very useful. It's the type of Magic I started off with. If you've an inclination to read more into the magical properties of herbs, may I suggest Scott Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magic Herbs ? It's a great read full of much usefull information that may help you discern what you may want to add to your personal herb garden. I myself have one in my back yard. They look beautiful and have many uses. Sadly, gardening isn't for everyone, but those who do like to garden I advise taking MagnoliaLove's post to heart.

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Re: Home Medicine Garden
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Post # 3
I have a question for you though, I have many wild cats roaming my streets and they tend to dig my garden up for the purpose of taking a shite. What would be a good way to keep them out of my garden?
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Re: Home Medicine Garden
By: / Beginner
Post # 4
Perhaps make a little garden in a corner of your lot and plant some cat grass or catnip. That way hopefully they would have their own spot so you can have yours! ^_^
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Re: Home Medicine Garden
By: / Knowledgeable
Post # 5
Hey, Spirit, just a quick aside: If you like planting cat grass, and want to save a little money, cat grass is barley. You can find barley for much less when it is not labeled specifically for cats. Plus, you'll have plenty to sprout some indoors during colder months, and be able to replenish the cat grass whenever it's been chewed down.
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Re: Home Medicine Garden
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Post # 6
Thank you i will definitely have to try that.
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Re: Home Medicine Garden
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Post # 7
I am a dirt person, I love working in dirt. I always have a garden but recently I moved into town from the country and I don't have a lot of space outside, what i do have is a lot of gravel and a very small deck. What I would like to know is what kind of herbs I can grow successfully inside and on a deck that doesn't get alot of sun. I have tons of lavender that I have saved and they are growing wonderfully in my kitchen window but other than that I have nothing else. Any advice would be wonderful. Would like to know best herbs to grow inside and not a whole like of sun. I can put them out in the sun around my place once it gets warmer, but would like to start inside now. Thank you
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