Herbs for Dry Soil?

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Herbs for Dry Soil?
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Post # 1
I have a bit of an issue with parts of my garden. I'm planning to plant some herbs in my garden when spring rolls around, but a lot of my soil is very dry. Even when I water the soil, it tends to dry up very quickly. I can't really move the herbs to other parts of the garden either, because those are saved for other plants. So the main things I'd like help with are:

1) What kinds of herbs would do well in dry soil?
2) How can I fix the dry soil, without having to flood it with too much water?

Thank you for taking the time to read this, I really appreciate it.
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Re: Herbs for Dry Soil?
By: Moderator / Knowledgeable
Post # 2
Which herbs plant prefer dry soil?
Plants that like dry soil, such as santolina, curry plant, oregano, rosemary and thyme, do well in containers, which dry out more quickly than garden sites. Tropical or tender herbs, such as lemon verbena, jasmine or passionflower, are ideal for growing in pots, which can be moved indoors for the winter.
Contain Your Passion: A Guide to Growing Herbs - Mother Earth Living
https://www.motherearthliving.com/.../contain-your-passion-a-guide-to-growing-herbs

https://soiltosupper.com/simple-ways-to-fix-dry-garden-soil/
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Re: Herbs for Dry Soil?
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Post # 3
Thanks, I'll definitely try those plants out! And fixing the soil will work just fine for me now that I know what I need.
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Re: Herbs for Dry Soil?
By: Moderator / Knowledgeable
Post # 4
The soil probably is too sandy in order for it to dry too fast, or it might be positioned in a place that is not levelled well and the water drains fast.

You can always improve the fertility and water retention of your soil by adding manure, compost and mix it well with the upper layer of the soil. Adding additional mulch and tree bark would help as well.

Most plants do not like growing in very poor of nutrients soils. Adding just plants that like good drainage might not work for you, if that soil is very poor and mostly contains sand and similar minerals. Therefore, the drainage might not be your only issue because when the water runs out of somewhere it is either because of the elevation of the place or because of the actual construct of the soil.

Every plant needs nutrients in order to thrive. If nothing grows on that place and nothing has grown on it for years, that means the levels on nitrogen, potassium and phosphor in this soil are extremely low if existent at all. What makes a soil fertile is the vegetation that grew on in, which then died, got broken down by fungi and bacteria and the worms aided the process. Of course, worms, fungi and bacteria need water in order to function and thrive and to be able to recycle and enrich the soil.

You might need to significantly work on the soil improvement before planting anything.The nutrient rich soils are usually dark/black in colour and they are neither too water logged and neither too free draining. Good soils are full with live. You can see worms, bugs, roots and fungi in you dig into their upper layer. If you dig the soul 10 cm deep and you see no sign of any life it is not a good sign.
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