Crossroads at Midnight

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Crossroads at Midnight
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Post # 1
There are many meanings for this term.I would like to know more opinions and experiences because I’m very curious.
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Re: Crossroads at Midnight
By: / Knowledgeable
Post # 2
In some traditions, a crossroads is seen as a place of converging and diverging paths of energy, in all four directions. Some beliefs say the roads must face the cardinal directions, though many people say that is not strictly necessary.

In some folk beliefs in the South, there are beliefs about going to a (remote, basically with no person's dwelling in sight) crossroads at midnight for nine days. On the ninth night, to take along an object in an area where one would like to improve. Supposedly 'the Devil' will appear, and make a deal. For payment, he will 'bless' the item, and with it the person will find success. The most famous tale is of the Blues musician Robert Johnson, when he met the devil in Rosedale, Mississippi; a concept reiterated in the 80s movie 'Crossroads,' and also in ,the movie, 'Oh, Brother, Where Art Thou' (both which happen to have pretty good soundtracks).

Of course, beliefs vary a good bit, even in relatively densely populated areas. Growing up, I'd heard warnings against speaking to anyone at a crossroads at midnight, as it was the Devil who was tempting anyone there, intending to steal their souls or take them to Hell.

Midnight, in general, would be considered a time of transition. It is the darkest part of night, and around the point between sunset and sunrise (also consider many of these tales date to when time was largely told by the sun, as most people could not afford watches, when and where these tales were originated). It is the time when one day officially ends, and another officially begins.

Many beliefs also revolve around the Lwa, but I know very little about them, so I will not say what I do not know.
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Re: Crossroads at Midnight
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Post # 3
I myself use cross roads for certain rituals and petitions. Elegua
Èù-lgbára
Member of Orisha
A Santo from a religion..jpg
Elegua depicted as a young man
Other names Eleggua, Eleguá
Venerated in Yoruba religion, Santería, Candomblé
Region Nigeria, Latin America,
Ethnic group Yoruba people

A depiction of Ellegua
Elegua (Yoruba: Èù-lgbára, also spelled Eleggua; known as Eleguá in Latin America) is an Orisha, a deity of roads in the religions of Santeria, Candomblé and in Palo Mayombe. He is syncretized with either Saint Michael, Saint Anthony of Padua, or the Holy Child of Atocha. [1] [2]


In Africa
Elegua is known as Èù-lgbára in the Yoruba religion and is closely associated with Eshu. lgbára means the "master of force" in the Yoruba language. [1] [2]

Santeria
Eleguá is also known as the Regla de Ocha in Cuba, where is the orisha and "owner" of caminos, or roads and paths. All ceremonies and rituals in Santeria must first have the approval by Eleguá before progressing. He is the messenger of Olofi. He differs somewhat from Exu, who in this case is seen as his brother, by having dangerous and less aggressive characteristics. Eluguá moves silently; in contrast, Exu "breaks through". Manifestations or associated orishas of Eleguá includes Akefun, Aleshujade, Arabobo, Awanjonu, Lalafán, Obasín, Oparicocha, and Osokere.

There is a pataki (story) in Santeria in which Olodumare gives Eleguá the keys to the past, present, and future; for this reason, Eleguá is often depicted holding a set of keys. A figure of Eleguá may be placed in the house behind the entrance door.

Eleggua is the most important orisha in Santeria. He opens the way and allows ache to flow in the universe. Eleggua (also spelled Elegua, Elewa, Elegba or Legba) is the most important of the orishas in Santeria. Elegua was the first orisha created by Olodumare and he existed prior to and witnessed creation unfold.

And for this reason i use crossroads in most rituals. I have never met Any demon yet at any cross roads.
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Re: Crossroads at Midnight
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Post # 4
I have very little information about the Loa.
But I know that a Loa is a spirit of Vodou that aids the practitioner in certain aspects of life, such as success, sexuality, spirituality, and even in death. I look at the Loa as types of angels or guardians, as they seem to instill certain wisdoms and truths in their human followers/callers. The Loa are usually divided into groups or "nations" known as Nanchons in the Vodou religion.

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Re: Crossroads at Midnight
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Post # 5
Spirits after they die, start to cross over. It's a process they all go undergo and there has been many myths about things like entitites waiting there for deals for some reasons...
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Re: Crossroads at Midnight
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Post # 6
Are they still myths?
That’s the question.
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Re: Crossroads at Midnight
By: / Knowledgeable
Post # 7
Why would they no longer be myths? Tales do not simply cease to exist.
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Re: Crossroads at Midnight
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Post # 8
The question was whether these are true nowadays or not.
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Re: Crossroads at Midnight
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Post # 9
I think they are...
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