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Forums -> Misc Topics -> Warlock

Warlock
By:
Post # 1
So, I found this video, which I will paste the link for below, which talks about the word "warlock" and what it means in different cultures and time periods and contexts. I found it very interesting and eye-opening in a sense.

Here's the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDAoBZoIMN0

Just copy and paste and there you go! After you've seen the video, you can tell me your thoughts on the video and the word "warlock" ^.^ thank you for looking at this~
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Re: Warlock
By: Moderator / Adept
Post # 2
Many words change their meaning over the years; especially in English! Warlock in modern English is a bit derogatory,from the old term for "betrayer" or "traitor". Words change! Take the word "nice".In modern usage it means "good"; such as "it tastes nice".
The original meaning was "accurate; exact".
And, as English became a world-wide language, we get hilarious "mix-ups" of language! To an American a Flat is a puncture in a tyre; (tire!!!). In England it is a residential Apartment. And there are many such words.
No modern, male witch, would call himself a warlock. Or a wizard!
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Re: Warlock
By:
Post # 3
thats amazing, i always say nice! when i eat something good, go figure
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Re: Warlock
By:
Post # 4
Brysing, I always thought of "Warlock" as being only from the old English "oath breaker", but I found this video interesting as it shows there's more than one origin for it. I like the Nordic origin, but I do agree that a lot of people find it derogatory or offensive to be called that. I, personally, wouldn't call myself a warlock nor would I call anyone else that, but I do think it's okay to kind or reclaim that word or for someone else to identify as such and I respect the labels people choose for themselves. To me, it's kind of like the N word or the T word or words like "faggot" or the S word--the people who those words were made to put down have reclaimed those words and occasionally even label themsleves these words. Though, I do think that if someone wants to label themsleves a warlock, they need to do some research and learn the history of it from all sides.
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Re: Warlock
By: Moderator / Adept
Post # 5
As I said, words change.Most married women in England would be addressed as "Missus", and the abbreviation for that word is Mrs, But the origin of the word is "Mistress". A totally different meaning in modern usage! I have a friend who was in the USA staying with a family that had two small children. My friend had a hobby, drawing. Can you imagine the effect when he asked where he could buy some rubbers? To an American it would have a totally different meaning than "Erasers".
Language, and the history of it ,is fascinating.
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Re: Warlock
By: Moderator / Knowledgeable
Post # 6

The idea of "warlock" as being from Norse origins has become popular amongst those who wish to use the title without the stigma of its Anglo-Saxon origins. But trust me, my Scandanavian Pagan friends say quite unequivocably that the term "warlock" is not derived from any of the Nordic languages, nor does the word they are trying to use as an antecedant to "warlock" hold the meanings that these people wish to make it seem that it does. The video is incorrect on a number of different levels.

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Re: Warlock
By:
Post # 7
Brysing, you're totally right that linguistics is always a fascinating subject ^.^ also, it is true that in America, when we want erasers, we say "erasers" instead of "rubbers". In our vernacular, "rubbers" means "condoms". Though condoms are normally made out of latex and not rubber...
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Re: Warlock
By:
Post # 8
Lark, I don't know his sources (though he might have them listed in the description, I didn't check yet). Though if that's what your Scandinavian friends say, I'll take their word for it. If you have sources for me to check out, though, that would be cool ^.^
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Re: Warlock
By: Moderator / Adept
Post # 9
MaidenCrow, there's another word for you! Latex is "Rubber", when it first comes from the tree!
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Re: Warlock
By:
Post # 10
Brysing, latex is made from rubber? lol I feel so silly now! I gues that's why condoms are called rubbers then X'D
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