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Anglo-Saxon Runes

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Forums -> Norse Paganism -> Anglo-Saxon Runes

Anglo-Saxon Runes
By:
Post # 1
Well then, i've recently received an alphabet of Anglo-Saxon runes from a friend of mine today. I don't know much about these runes or runes in general so i'm wondering what exactly is up with Anglo-Saxon runes? The general info I go from my friend was that it was a sort of dragon language, as (according to the anonymous book he got the alphabet from) dragons themselves had appeared before during those ancient times, and began carving and engraving these runes on trees and rocks and, well anything really around them. Thus, the language of the dragons. But this is still new to me, does anyone think they can help me on learning more about the Anglo-Saxon runes?
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Runes
By:
Post # 2

I'm not sure much about Anglo-Saxon Runes, though I'm reminded of Ogham (another written, Magickal language). As for Dragons, I'd ask Nakir about them. He knows the most on that subject that I know of.

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Runes
By:
Post # 3
Nakir, is that a member on this site?
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Runes
By: / Knowledgeable
Post # 4
The elder furthark was the first (known) runes. They were created before 800CE and there were 24.

Then in 500CE the Gothic Runes/Alphabet appearred--simply a modified version of the furthark. But sometime inbetween this (400-1000CE) the Furthorc aka Anglo Saxon runes surfaced. Almost identical to the elder furthark with the addition of 9 new ones to make up for the language progression. The runes added included an "st" sound "io" sound, "q" and consistent "g" in comparison to geybo which can be pronounced as g, y, or gh.

There is also a younger furthark which only has 16 characters.

But it all boils down to one point, they are all of the same origin, and all runes. Even the celts had a rendition of the runes, but no one knows the complete set they used, only the few they have found engraved on artifacts.

My suggestion to you is to search this site with the key word "rune"
Sunnyway.com is an excellent online source as well. I personally have read every book on runes and norse mythology that I could find. The mythology ties in with the runes themselves and will help you to better understand their meaning.

And runes aren't a dragon alphabet/language. I'm sorry to disappoint you.
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Runes
By:
Post # 5
Ahh wonderful then. I never really cared if the runes were related to dragons or not, but I will still look into them as they are part of my family history.
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Runes
By: Moderator / Knowledgeable
Post # 6
One of the best books I've found on Runes is "Taking Up The Runes" by Diana Paxson. Two other authors that I recommend are Edred Thorsson and Freya Aswynn. I'd also recommend the book s "Germanic Magic" by Swain Wodening and "Teutonic Magic" by Kveldulf Gundarsson which deal specifically with Anglo-Saxon runes and magic Avoid the books by Ralph Blum which are full of incorrect information.

You might also find the following websites to be useful in learning more about the runes and how to use them:

http://sunnyway.com/runes/

http://davensjournal.com/interpretation-cheat-sheet

It's important to remember that the runes are drawn from the culture and beliefs of the Germanic peoples. To fully understand them and work with them to their fullest potential it is important to also become very familiar with the beliefs and practices of those ancient peoples. So I would also suggest that you begin reading both the Eddas and the Sagas so you understand the worldview in which the runes work.
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Runes
By: / Knowledgeable
Post # 7
As always, Lark has a great post.

I would like to add a bit about Blum.

Even though Ralph Blum is not traditional, I did enjoy his "The Book of Runes". People criticize it, but if you read the book from the beginning, he clearly states that the book is based off of his own personal interpretation after meditating on each rune individually. I would not use his definitions myself. However, I found the book to be very philosophical and thought provoking. He focuses a lot on the Self (which stems from the Hindu atman or true self) in comparison to the runes. Very creative in my opinion!

If anyone does plan to read the book, I suggest reading the traditional ways first so that Blum doesn't confuse you. Any book that supports the "blank" rune, isn't traditional.

An interesting observation of mine is that those of strong Christian backgrounds prefer Blum to traditional books because it has more of a non-denomination viewpoint whereas other books have a heavier presence of Norse belief, especially Aswynn.

I'm not recommending Blum, but I don't think they he should be entirely discredited as an author. His book is a mix of myth, philosophy and personal belief all wrapped around the idea of the runes. Key word is "idea". But still an overall good read.
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Runes
By:
Post # 8
I'd suggest looking at Stephen Pollington's writings if it's Anglo-Saxon runes you are particularly interested in. http://www.stevepollington.com/books.html
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Runes
By:
Post # 9
Sorage,

I'm actually looking for some similar information. Runes, Elder Futhark in particular, are related to a dragon language that I'm searching for. Old Norse might be helpful in your endeavors as that is the closest "magickal" language I can find that has any relation to dragons. If you could possibly tell me what anonymous book your friend got the information from it could be a great benefit and would be greatly appreciated.

~Rowan
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Runes
By: Moderator / Knowledgeable
Post # 10
This thread has been moved to Norse Paganism from Misc Topics.
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